Word of Caution (okay I’m jumping up/down)

Good afternoon, Fellow Neighbors!

The repairs have begun in our neighborhood bringing many strangers into our midst.

It is imperative that you keep your doors/windows safely secured with the alarms set when you are not present.

This includes, but is not limited to, vehicles, houses, garage apartments, back yard gates, side yard gates, children’s play houses, the dog house, the cat’s preferred spot of the day, the shelter holding your lawn equipment or heavily used exercise equipment, and anything else that holds anything that you value.

All items of value should be removed from your car on a nightly basis especially if the car must be parked on the street, in your driveway, or in your neighbor’s driveway.  This is especially vehicles parked without occupants for any longer than about 5 seconds.

This includes, but is not limited to, garage door openers, all of your lap tops, check books, liquid refreshments, credit cards, makeup, half-eaten food, cologne, science experiments (maybe not the McDonald’s french fry under the seat), luggage with dirty clothes, shopping bags full of bargains from Macy’s, Kindle’s, IPads, insurance papers, pets, children, spouses, babysitters, car seats and anything else that looks enticing enough to have a window broken in your car.

The car glass folks are backlogged (probably through the rest of the year) with the recent storm so quick repairs due to broken windows will probably not happen.  If the bad guys find an unlocked car, the valuable possessions in your car are gone.

Also, if you are talking on the phone when you get out of your car, then you are not focused on what you are doing and can be easily distracted leaving your vehicle, your home, AND you at risk.

The bad guys are watching and waiting, and you don’t know what they look like nor what they are looking for.

Be safe!

Tim

2 thoughts on “Word of Caution (okay I’m jumping up/down)

  1. karen

    These tips were originally published by the Forest Hillcrest Neighborhood Association.

    Point #1

    The insurance company is obligated to you and no one else, and will fund the claim payments directly to you. The insurance company wants you to be in control of your money. Don’t sign anything with anyone until after your insurance company has sent you your first check.

    Some roofing contractors want you to sign a contract with them that, in most cases, looks like an acknowledgement that the salesperson came to your home and offered to help you. In the fine print, you just agreed to have this company do the work to your house as soon as the roof is determined to be a total loss, with them absorbing your deductible.

    Point #2

    Select a responsible and reputable company to do the work. There are a lot of new companies roaming the neighborhood that have been in business just a short while. You don’t want to give a deposit to any company at the time of signing a contract. Some new and fraudulent companies have been known to take your deposit and leave town. If you don’t know the company you are considering using, request referrals and do some checking.

    Point #3

    Don’t give any money to any contractor until the job is done. If a contractor wants a deposit, then just say, “No, thanks; I’ll pass.” Our procedure is to submit an invoice and request payment when the job is done. The insurance company will have given you a deposit to do the work within a few days of approving your claim. Keep that money and pay the full amount to the contractor upon completion of the work. The contractor and you should submit a request together for the balance of the payment of the claim. When you receive it (usually 10 to 14 days later), pay your contractor what is due and keep whatever difference is available.

    Point #4

    The insurance company will pay your claim based on the type of roof and accessories you have. If you have a specific kind of roof that costs more than a typical roof, your claim payment will be reflected in that way. Don’t let the contractor sell you roofing material that costs $100 per square (one square equals 100 square feet) when the roof you have costs $180 per square. Guess where the difference goes—and it’s not in your pocket! The flue pipes, vents, and plumbing stack roof jacks should be replaced if necessary with equal or better materials than are present on the roof. Ask to see what you are getting and go outside and look on your roof to see if it is better. One-piece lead jacks for plumbing vents are the best. The rubber seal jacks rot pretty fast in our hot sun.

    Point #5

    All contracts done with a residential customer in Texas have a 3 day right of rescission.

    Point #6

    Lack of attic ventilation is a real problem in North Texas. As part of replacing your roof, make sure that the roofing contractor meets or exceeds the building code in terms of the amount of ventilated area in your attic. There is not one house that I have seen in our neighborhood that passes the building code requirements. Adding vents in the overhangs and on top of the roof up to including the use of fans needs to be evaluated. A good rule of thumb is to have one square foot of vent per 100 square foot of roof surface area. The vents need be 50% in the overhang or lower portion of the roof and the other 50% should be at or near the top of the roof. If mechanical means are used, then one should be careful to not have vents near the fan as the air will follow the path of least resistance. Sometimes only electric fans will exhaust hot attic air so where they are placed is important. Installing the right amount of ventilation will lower your electric bill because your attic will not get as hot in the summer, therefore your shingles won’t get as hot and will last longer. Having too much ventilation at the top of your roof and not having enough at the overhangs will cause a negative pressure on any opening in your ceiling so that your air conditioning will be sucked into your attic. Usually, recessed lights (older models) and drop-down attic stairs are the biggest source of these leaks.

    Point #7

    Get more than one price. When you take control of your money, you can get as many bids as you like. Make sure you’re getting bids on the same thing. Compare roofing materials, accessories and any improvements to your ventilation. The lowest price may not be the best deal. Make sure you have a reputable contractor. In the end, a well-installed roof will make your life much easier and save you money.

  2. karen

    Here are a few more things to think about when selecting a roofing company. These tips were originally published by Forest Hillcrest Neighborhood Association:

    Point #1

    The insurance company is obligated to you and no one else, and will fund the claim payments directly to you. The insurance company wants you to be in control of your money. Don’t sign anything with anyone until after your insurance company has sent you your first check.

    Some roofing contractors want you to sign a contract with them that, in most cases, looks like an acknowledgement that the salesperson came to your home and offered to help you. In the fine print, you just agreed to have this company do the work to your house as soon as the roof is determined to be a total loss, with them absorbing your deductible.

    Point #2

    Select a responsible and reputable company to do the work. There are a lot of new companies roaming the neighborhood that have been in business just a short while. You don’t want to give a deposit to any company at the time of signing a contract. Some new and fraudulent companies have been known to take your deposit and leave town. If you don’t know the company you are considering using, request referrals and do some checking.

    Point #3

    Don’t give any money to any contractor until the job is done. If a contractor wants a deposit, then just say, “No, thanks; I’ll pass.” Our procedure is to submit an invoice and request payment when the job is done. The insurance company will have given you a deposit to do the work within a few days of approving your claim. Keep that money and pay the full amount to the contractor upon completion of the work. The contractor and you should submit a request together for the balance of the payment of the claim. When you receive it (usually 10 to 14 days later), pay your contractor what is due and keep whatever difference is available.

    Point #4

    The insurance company will pay your claim based on the type of roof and accessories you have. If you have a specific kind of roof that costs more than a typical roof, your claim payment will be reflected in that way. Don’t let the contractor sell you roofing material that costs $100 per square (one square equals 100 square feet) when the roof you have costs $180 per square. Guess where the difference goes—and it’s not in your pocket! The flue pipes, vents, and plumbing stack roof jacks should be replaced if necessary with equal or better materials than are present on the roof. Ask to see what you are getting and go outside and look on your roof to see if it is better. One-piece lead jacks for plumbing vents are the best. The rubber seal jacks rot pretty fast in our hot sun.

    Point #5

    All contracts done with a residential customer in Texas have a 3 day right of rescission.

    Point #6

    Lack of attic ventilation is a real problem in North Texas. As part of replacing your roof, make sure that the roofing contractor meets or exceeds the building code in terms of the amount of ventilated area in your attic. Adding vents in the overhangs and on top of the roof up to including the use of fans needs to be evaluated. A good rule of thumb is to have one square foot of vent per 100 square foot of roof surface area. The vents need be 50% in the overhang or lower portion of the roof and the other 50% should be at or near the top of the roof. If mechanical means are used, then one should be careful to not have vents near the fan as the air will follow the path of least resistance. Sometimes only electric fans will exhaust hot attic air so where they are placed is important. Installing the right amount of ventilation will lower your electric bill because your attic will not get as hot in the summer, therefore your shingles won’t get as hot and will last longer. Having too much ventilation at the top of your roof and not having enough at the overhangs will cause a negative pressure on any opening in your ceiling so that your air conditioning will be sucked into your attic. Usually, recessed lights (older models) and drop-down attic stairs are the biggest source of these leaks.

    Point #7

    Get more than one price. When you take control of your money, you can get as many bids as you like. Make sure you’re getting bids on the same thing. Compare roofing materials, accessories and any improvements to your ventilation. The lowest price may not be the best deal. Make sure you have a reputable contractor. In the end, a well-installed roof will make your life much easier and save you money.

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